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done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
there is nothing more important than a quality education. except perhaps a quantity education which is dr.i went to the 6th grade three times in a row. hang in there, buddy, it gets better. now i'm no fan of the department of education but i do like their new common core standards. >> which are going to be less emphasis on reading literature and more on reading memos and instruction manuals. so i was ready to give the common core an f for fantastic. then i saw something that made me change that to an a for angry. jim? >> 45 states adopting the obama administration's common core curriculum which does not require that cursive be taught in school. >> there are many children today who can't even read cursive writing let alone write it. >> stephen: written off. >> cursive writing is no longer part of what is called quote, unquote, the common core state standards. this means that cursive is no longer considered a core skill that youngsters must learn. >> stephen: nation, that cranky raisin is right. the obama administration is waging a war on cursive, or possibly a wayne on lursive, it's kind of hard
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
the variety of views we had for instance when the heritage foundation -- heritage was about education reform and getting a lot of different conservatives together. they would fight like heck about the best way forward on education reform, the best way forward on tax reform. jack kempe would have horrible fights with phil gramm and others and then they would come together and come up with a tax reform plan. there were to be constant battles on the budget. there were a lot of different ways forward in the conservatives we believe even into the 90s, 1994 we always talked about a legislative laboratory of ideas and you talked about the place of ideas and we talked about the free marketplace of ideas. we would close the doors and go downstairs and debate nonstop among ourselves until we came up with the best plan for reform moving for it. just not the case anymore. if you veer off the path a little bit to the right or a little bit to the left there are ideological witch hunts and people suggesting you are insufficiently conservative and insufficiently republican. that is the 9% party. that's the
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> this is "inside story." i'm ray suarez. we have rick seany with fair compare compare, and douglas kidd, and terry trip letter, an aviation analyst who runs a consumer website called "the plane rules." you heard terry trip letter laying out the ways that this could be good for all the stake hold efforts involved, but we have lived through an era of mega mergers. have they done any of the things that terry suggests? >> i'm not sure that they have. the primary benefit that all these mergers have provided is that they've kept carriers in business while they have consolidated. while the carriers are in business, we want them to make money and provide good service there has been to my mind especially among the u.s. carriers a focus more on making money rather than pleasing the passenger . in this with regard we know going to the airport is like going to a carnival where you pay your fe
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
american education policy in connecticut. >> on august 9, 1974 vice president ford was sworn in as president of the united states. this is the dress that ms. ford was wearing at the swearing in ceremony. she was less than excited about becoming first lady but president ford encouraged her saying we can do this. she resolved if i have to do this, i'm going to have fun doing it. within 10-days she had a state dinner to entertain king hussein of jordan. she had to prepare for that as her role of first lady and she hit the ground running. first lady betty ford monday night at 9:00 eastern. >> next is constitution and role judges with supreme court thomas. this is from the 2013 lawyer's convention in washington, d.c. it's a little less than an hour. >> thank you, david. could evening, everyone. it is my great honor and pleasure to introduce our distinguished guest this evening. although much of what i might say by way of introduction is no doubt familiar to all of you. justice clarence thomas has served with great distinction on the united states supreme court for more than two de
faith and insistence on the importance of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his determination. -- his location -- his vocation. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of g
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
was familiar with howard and the extent to which howard had anticipated in african education the same as the university of ft. hayre has participated in african education in east and central africa. that was a very smooth relationship for the two universities and i went there as a result set up an office, howard university, to help put in place collaboration between our university and university at howard. the bottom line of that was that we at howard established what we call the south african research and archive al project to study the anti-apartheid movement in the united states. >> dr. harris, what would you say is the legacy, the dual legacy, of nelson mandela both in south africa and in this country? and i guess i'm asking that specificically because you sort of had a bird's eye view of what he was able to do in the country and what he was able to create by extension, by reaching out to howard university to say we want there to be some role here in what happens with south africa going forward. >> well, we were very excited when he came because everyone knew about him. in respons
was absolutely passionate about education, and he had a great affinity with children, because remember, 27 years in prison, he hardly saw a child. and it was the one thing he said he really missed was the touch of a child. so he paid a lot of attention to the youth. and as you say, democracy here in south africa, the anniversary of those first democratic elections is next year, it was 20 years ago. so a lot of people, a lot of these people here didn't know apartheid, didn't know about the feel, the indignities of it, but they still know that nelson mandela made sacrifices for them. and the key is -- and he was very, very passionate about it -- he wanted his legacy to live on way after he had gone. and dethat he did that, "you ca like me in a small way. it's not hard to be nelson mandela. just pay attention to the people close to you and keep on trying hard and never give up." that in a way is his legacy. >> and they are living his legacy out. robin, thank you. appreciate it. >> reporter: okay. >>> one of the icons of new york honored nelson mandela last night. look at this. the top of the empire
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> if you've been suffering from back or shoulder problems lately, could be your cell phone or tablet's fault. >> you're probably not thinking about this, but there's a growing condition out there called i-posture and this is neither sexy nor cool. lesli foster found out doctors are reporting more and more people under age 30 are showing up on their doorsteps with some unfamiliar aches and pains. >> cell phones, tablets, laptops, everything you go people are glued to their devices. mobile electronic use has grown significantly over the past decade and so has the number of people suffering from back pain. >> people don't follow correct body mechanics and we see this often when people use the tablets and iphones. >> take a look. people are hunched over or have slouched posture while they use their tablets and mobile phones and this c
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
in the education community west teachers are going to start teaching to the test. but for some of the evaluations do. congresswoman titus could attest to years in academia. you don't want to test knowledge of multiple-choice exams. that is comprehensive understanding and that is what our big concern is that the american legion. thank you. >> i thank the gentleman and i thank you call today for your testimony in the work you do on found [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> this'll be our final count today. we welcome mr. tom murphy, director compensation service the veterans benefit administration, all so this sub one of the regional office. we also welcome sondra mccauley, deputy assistant general for audit evaluations of the office of inspector general department of veterans affairs. ms. mccauley is accompanied that mr. brent arronte, director of san diego benefit inspections division. we appreciate your attendance today. complete amid statements will be in the hearing record. mr. murphy, you're now recognized for five minutes. >> chairman runyan, ranking member tightness, than
-house education collegettee examines affordability and appel grant program. you can see it live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span three. colombian president one man well santos speaks at the national press club about the economic and political situation in colombia. that is live also on c-span3. >> as you walk in, there tables out front with pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. howpamphlets are all about the government is trying to take away your guns. those were the guys i wanted to talk to. they were the guys with the leaflets. i said to them. is this yourself? and they said yeah, who are you. i said i am an academic, a researcher and i'm doing research on these organizations and these ideas and trying to understand them. a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and said -- and asked me questions. i said look, here's what i am. i don't get it. here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your worldview. look, you will not convince me, and i will not convince you. that is off the table. what is on the table is at one to understand why you think the way you do
of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things, too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his vocation. he left the seminary. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of government. as a legislative aide to senator danforth, as
out of this government. there is not enough education for them and the jobs aren't plentiful enough, the pay is not plentiful, the housing is substandard. they feel they have not made any progress and in many cases they have stopped hoping for it. they said we need another government. there is a lot of pride in nelson mandela but there remains mostly because of economics a lot of advertis dissatisfaction. in his time or in his memory he hasn't been able to bridge the economic gap. tony. >> ali velshi. thank you. jonathan betz is here. jonathan. >> it is going to be a who's who of royals, celebrities, a leader of every major country will be in south africa, 100 have rscped so far. the queen of gland can't make it but david cameron can. mandela also close with cuba so its president, rool castro, -- raul castro will be there. hassan rouhani is coming. put not israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he is concerned about the high security cost. >>> the dalai lama will be there. ful of johannesburg wip be shut down. an entire airport will be set aside for just the vips. security will
have health care, kids would be educated, we wouldn't have two million people locked up in jail and we wouldn't have drones destroying the lives of people that we don't know. god bless the pope. and i'm glad the cardinal hears him. i wish other religions would hear them, because there's a vacuum in congress. capitalism is the best thing in the world, but it's not set up to take care of the poor. >> congressman charlie rangel, great to have you here. i think you can easily invest in green ba nananabananas. thanks for your time. >>> joining me now, editor of the "washington post" wonkblog, ezra klein. good to see you, buddy. it was a big weekend for the administration. now they're touting these big gains, coming out with nbc news being able to verify these numbers. 100,000 numbers successfully selected health insurance plans in november, up from the 27,000 in october. and we had jennifer palmieri speak to our chuck todd this morning. i want to play more about what she has to say about promoting this website. >> the question about what you're getting at, i think, is whether or not we're t
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> we're back with jj ramberg, josh barrow and robert reich. j.j., whether the drones materialize or not, i think it's kind of a pr stunt, frankly, but the future of retail is stuff coming to you rather than you going to stuff. >> exactly. you went into the break asking what does it look like, right when we don't have any stores anymore? and i can tell you what it looks like, because we've spent the last year on my show going around main street usa and asking small businesses how they're doing. and town after town, what we saw was there were these agricultural, industrial towns, factories moved away, main street kind of disappeared. then it built up, big box stores came in, took all the business and then main street went down again. crime, you know, boarded-up store fronts. and now, the main streets that are doing well are working together to try and market themselves as a whole. come to main street because we are helping our community. it's almost like a tourist destination. >> that's interesting. and one of the things you've
and educational equity that might provide us equal footing. so in that case, it's much ado about nothing. it's a lot of talk. as james brown said, you're talking loud and saying nothing. >> zerlina, how aggressive should the white house be on the heels of this website, massingive provement meeting the date? >> very aggressive. as a person uninsured and has been on the new york exchange, i think that people that are uninsured have a great deal of patience. and the white house should exploit that patience. because people that are uninsured want health insurance. and that's why the traffic is so high. i think they need to be very aggressive here and say the website is getting better and better and people are going to fundamentally -- their lives are going to change. >> time for the offense. no doubt about it. michael eric dyson, sgher lena maxwell, thanks for being on "the ed show." appreciate it. >>> coming up, a north dakota local news station keeps it classy. how are things with the new guy? all we do is go out to dinner. that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...wh
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. stick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. now my hands look great. [ female announcer ] gold bond intensive hand cream. this stuff really works! >>> welcome back to the sports lead. it is pretty obvious what the sports lead is. it is hard to ignore what many people are calling the greatest college football game ever played. auburn's stunning, really unheard of walk-off win over its bitter rival, number one, alabama, formerly number one, alabama. you get a true sense of the agony and the ecstasy through the play by play guys. they probably think they've seen it all and they probably pretty much did, until this weekend. first, here's the play as the crimson tide's broadcasters saw it. >> 57 yards to win the iron bowl. he spots it, kick on the way. it's got length. it is sailing. it is short. it is grabbed about eight yards deep in the e
want to make you money. my job is not just to educate you, but entertain you so call me at 800-743-cnbc. with the dow seek 95 points and the s&p dropping and at one point the selling was far worse and it looked like we could be in the midst of a major rollover. still today like yesterday, the buyers and sellers did real soul-searching, and what exactly are they pondering? basically, they're trying to figure out if good news about the economy is bad news for stocks or is the opposite the case, as the economy improves should we like stocks more? it's a first-class quandary that we have to dive into headlong on "mad money" if we're going to figure out the market's move. it's distracted and a parlor game and we find you the best stocks and the best opportunities. the only focus on the fed's next move the last three years, you missed some of the single best moments to invest in our lifetimes. i regard that as terrible. i regard it as shameful because this fed-centric world presumes that the market is one big stock that is sent higher or lower by ben bernanke and janet yellin and it's the mar
advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. when you do what i do, iyou think about risk.. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> up next steve rattner will be here and former governor ed rendell joins the conversation. "morning joe" is
for education for every child so that we could be the first generation in history where every child went to school. and he warned us when we had that press conference, he said that to get every child to school we would have to end child labor, and we'd have to end child marriage and we'd have to end the discrimination against -- a campaign that he and his wife have been involved in ever since. and typically, nelson mandela at the beginning of his conference said that the cause was so urgent, they had now come out of retirement so that he could prosecute the cause. and at the end of the press conference, he said it was now up to the younger generation, and he was returning to his retirement now. [laughter] and then i visited him in south africa the week that his son died of aids. and while mourning and in grief and shocked by the event, he insisted in coming out to the waiting press with me. and he said that aids was not to be treated as a moral judgment. it was to be treated exactly like the tuberculosis that he had suffered as a disease in need of cure. his greatness as vast as the cont
enough educators on the team as required. the report does not recommend taking away the commission's authority. city college could lose the accreditation at the end of july. >>> it's time for ticket tuesday. you have a chance to win a four pack of tickets to sharks ice. it gives families a chance to enjoy holiday music while ice skating from now through january 5th. there are facilities in san jose, fremont and oakland. for your chance to win, go to ktvu.com, do it before midnight and put in the secret word, skate. good luck. >> skate. >>> almost 9:00. let's check back in with sal for traffic this morning. we're still looking at windy conditions. we haven't seen a lot of major crashes. fender-benders for sure. at the bay bridge you can see traffic is going to be backed up for at least a ten-hint -- ten-minute delay. also the morning commute in san jose on northbound 280 appears to be pretty good. southbound a little bit slow. that's southbound approaching 101. on 880 it's slow from 238 all the way up to downtown oakland. now let's go to steve. >>> partly cloudy. mostly cloudy. win
of education out of them and it lasts well beyond the holidays. >> star wars titles are huge this year, right? >> star wars has always been a great seller for us and they're a huge hit and lego is a big deal. we're thrilled that this year we're finding a lot of sales through this book right here the animal book. >> what do you like about that book? >> how you can do a lot of your favorite animals. >> what's your favorite animal? >> peacock. >> very fitting. a good one. >> so spontaneous. >> we appreciate it. this is the 6th year in a row. >> 6th or 7th? >> actually it's the 13th year. >> that's close. >> $1.4 million. >> that's amazing. thank you so much. we appreciate it. happy holidays to [ female announcer ] i like to mix things up a bit with grands mini pot pies. only four ingredients. and a few easy steps. weeknight dinner in a flash. and my family devours them. pillsbury grands biscuits. make dinner pop. guys... [ female announcer ] pillsbury cinnamon rolls, with cinnabon cinnamon, are an irresistible sunday morning idea. nothing calls them to the table faster. make breakfast pop! >>> g
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)